VR is an incredible way to play racing games, but itís not really the best way to play Driveclub.
Unlike a lot of VR projects at this early stage for the technology, Driveclub VR is a proper, full-fat game. Itís not a low calorie, 25-minute ďexperienceĒ, or a glorified tech demo; itís a content-rich racer packed with plenty of courses and cars, and hours and hours of solo and multiplayer racing. Unfortunately the trip from standard screens to PSVR has stripped Driveclub of most of what it does best Ė notably its cutting-edge visuals and weather effects Ė and the vast bulk of its content already exists in the 2014 original.*I firmly believe VR is an incredible way to play racing games, but itís not really the best way to play Driveclub.
Driveclub VRís first big sin is its surprising separation from the original Driveclub. While it recycles from the standard version of Driveclub heavily, even cribbing its intro vignette, everyone starts from scratch in Driveclub VR. Driveclub VR seems to dole out cars quicker as you level up but theyíre still mostly locked from use from the outset, regardless of how far youíve progressed in the original. This means plenty of unnecessary slogging for Driveclub veterans. My patience definitely grew thin treading over such similar ground, especially with the drift events which (despite how admirably and significantly Driveclub improved following its botched release) still favour speed over style, and still suffer for it.
Continue reading…

Read More...